Maldives Destroys British Statues Deemed Offensive To Islam

Police armed with pickaxes and power tools have destroyed the world’s first tidal gallery at a holiday resort in the Maldives after it was deemed ‘offensive to Islam’.

The gallery, at the Fairmont Maldives Sirru Fen Fushi, which opened in July, featured semi-submerged exhibits that disappeared and reappeared as the tide went in and out.

One policeman uses a saw to remove one of the figures from the top of the sculpture

 

But Abdulla Yameen, the outgoing president of the tourist nation, home to 340,000 Sunni Muslims, ordered the sculptures to be demolished. Islam, the official religion in the Maldives, bans the depiction of idols, and the work provoked some criticism from clerics even though the statues have no religious symbols or meaning.

Two men forcibly removing the figure

Yameen made the order in July, but his ruling was not acted upon until last Friday, the eve of a presidential election, which he lost to a liberal candidate.

The semi-submerged cube, pictured, was known as the Coralarium. It was designed by British artist Jason deCaires Taylor

The artwork, known as the Coralarium, was designed by British artist Jason deCaires Taylor.

It was claimed the gallery structure would act as a sheltered space that offers a permanent sanctuary for ocean life such as fish, crustaceans, octopuses and marine invertebrates

Resort guests could swim from the shore to the an underwater realm of human-shaped figures.

It is unclear why the sculptures were not raised from the waters until Friday, just two days before Yameen was turfed out of office 

It was claimed the gallery structure would act as a sheltered space that offers a permanent sanctuary for ocean life such as fish, crustaceans, octopuses and marine invertebrates.

While in the evening, an integrated light system illuminated the gallery and attracted marine life while creating an impressive sight from the island shore.

However, Yameen said in July that ‘significant public sentiment’ against the artwork known as ‘Coralarium’ had guided his decision to destroy it.

A snorkeller explores the tidal gallery

It is unclear why the sculptures were not raised from the waters until Friday, just two days before Yameen was turfed out of office.

Police were photographed chipping away at the works with pickaxes and using power tools to remove them from the large and ornate cage housing them.

A video posted by state media showed several men tearing a statue off a plinth.

Artist Mr deCaires Taylor told AFP in a statement: ‘I was extremely shocked and heartbroken to learn that my sculptures have been destroyed by the Maldivian authorities at the Coralarium, despite continued consultations and dialogue.

‘The Coralarium was conceived to connect humans to the environment and a nurturing space for marine life to thrive. Nothing else!

‘The Maldives is still beautiful, with a warm and friendly population, but it was a sad day for art and sad day for the environment.’

The import of statues is prohibited in the Maldives. Even depictions of the Buddha are banned despite a long legacy of Buddhism on the islands before Islam came to dominate the archipelago.

Despite the edict, huge cutouts of Yameen towered over the capital Male in the lead-up to Sunday’s poll, which he lost after five years of strongman rule marked by a regression from democracy.

Many of these cardboard posters depicting the ousted leader were torn down after he suffered a shock defeat to opposition candidate Ibrahim Mohamed Solih, an act of defiance unthinkable under his iron-fisted leadership.

 

Source Credit: Daily Mail